Addiction Specialist Testifies to Inaccuracy of Vowles Study: “It’s of zero assistance.”[1]

“But there was a big hole in the study, Tucker testified: It was a survey of 38 studies on opioid use disorder prevalence, not incidence. Prevalence is how many people in the population have a condition at a given time, whereas incidence is how many new people get the condition. The takeaway for Tucker was that Vowles far overstated the tendency of opioid prescriptions to cause opioid use disorder.


Dr. Douglas Tucker, June 30, 2021[1]

The Guardian Publishes False Article About This Website[2]

Soon after this website went online, The Guardian published an article with the following false statements — recklessly claiming this website omits content that is quite plainly available in detail.

False Claim

“However, the site does not address Purdue’s guilty pleas to federal crimes on two occasions, in 2007 and last year…”

Fact

False Claim

“Neither does it explain why the family is prepared to hand over a part of its fortune if it believes it did nothing wrong.”

Fact

False Claim

 “When the amount of opioid in the drugs is taken into account, OxyContin accounted for about 20% of the market.”

Fact

When measured by MME, OxyContin was never more than 16% of the market, peaking in 2001 and 2002: 
www.judgeforyourselves.info/key-points/oxycontin/market-share/

False Claim

“Two years ago, the National Bureau of Economic Research released a study of the impact of OxyContin which concluded that ‘the introduction and marketing of OxyContin explain a substantial share of overdose deaths over the last two decades’.”

Fact

The Guardian subsequently updated most of these errors.